inothernews:

The dancing lights of the aurora borealis over Finnish Lapland, 2011.

(via MSNBC.com)

I need to actually see these.


Short-tailed fruit bat (Carollia perspicillata)
Lateral (top) and ventral (bottom) views of stage 19 bat embryos as viewed by reflected light (left) or after alcian blue staining and clearing (right). 
photo by Chris Cretekos and Richard Behringer

It’s so tiny and adorable.

Short-tailed fruit bat (Carollia perspicillata)

Lateral (top) and ventral (bottom) views of stage 19 bat embryos as viewed by reflected light (left) or after alcian blue staining and clearing (right). 

photo by Chris Cretekos and Richard Behringer

It’s so tiny and adorable.

(via ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology)

inothernews:

Please watch this time-lapse video if you haven’t yet: images of Earth, taken from the International Space Station, stitched together into a 60-second “flyover” that would make Superman envious.

The cities lighted; the lightning strikes; the deep, dark blue of our oceans as backdrop for white, woven clouds.

It’s a beautiful reminder that yes, we live on a dynamic, wondrous planet.

(via MSNBC.com)

inothernews:

nightline:

ABC’s Ned Potter: Go outside before dawn, and if the Perseid meteor shower of 2011 is good to you, you will be able to see the sky falling.
Every year at this time, the Earth passes through the orbit of a comet called Swift-Tuttle, and the result is a meteor shower — shooting stars, up to 50 or 60 per hour — streaking across the night sky as debris from the comet enters the earth’s atmosphere and burns up.
Image: A Perseid meteor on the night of Aug. 12, 2008, near Rogers Spring in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Nevada. (Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

Goal for tonight: put long exposure setting on my camera to good use.

inothernews:

nightline:

ABC’s Ned Potter: Go outside before dawn, and if the Perseid meteor shower of 2011 is good to you, you will be able to see the sky falling.

Every year at this time, the Earth passes through the orbit of a comet called Swift-Tuttle, and the result is a meteor shower — shooting stars, up to 50 or 60 per hour — streaking across the night sky as debris from the comet enters the earth’s atmosphere and burns up.

Image: A Perseid meteor on the night of Aug. 12, 2008, near Rogers Spring in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Nevada. (Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

Goal for tonight: put long exposure setting on my camera to good use.

sirmitchell:

<3 Sagan

:)

(via inothernews)